Sick Again


Hi all – I have been trying to keep the Blog going in recent days despite being ill again – however, as I continue to get worse it is probably wise to have a complete break for the rest of the week and get as much sleep as I can.

I have had pneumonia 3 times since November last year (twice in November and once last month) and have come down sick again. Thought I was improving over the last couple of days but have once again developed the ‘shiver me timbers (chills and fever)’ tonight. So I plan to be away from the keyboard for the rest of the week in a bid to finally get over all of this illness. I apologise for the interruption to Blog posts in the mean time.

The Flying Frogs of Vietnam


The link below is to an article that reports on the discovery of a new flying frog in Vietnam – Helen’s Flying Frog.

For more visit:
https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/huge-new-flying-frog-discovered-in-vietnam.htm

The amazing peacock spider wants to shake its sexy flaps at you


Grist

The male members of the peacock spider species have something to show you. Here, get a little closer — they’re really tiny, about five millimeters long.

That flap you see there? That is for the laaadiez. These spider fellas use their colorful appendages to convince female peacock spiders to mate with them.

Also, they do a little dance. Here you can see a few of these guys in action:

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Climate change could lead to more volcanic eruptions


Grist

volcano

Listen, uh, nobody panic or anything, but it’s starting to look like over the last million years, natural climate change and the resulting sea-level rise might have increased the number of volcanic eruptions tenfold. But I’m sure that doesn’t mean that increasingly rapid human-caused climate change and sea-level rise will have a similar effect! I mean really, why would it?

Actually, the authors of this new study in the journal Geology have been very quick to say that even if human-made climate change were bumping up volcanic eruptions, we wouldn’t see the effects for centuries. But in the past, periods of rapid sea-level increase have led to drastic increases in volcanic activity. When shifts in Earth’s orbit caused warming and rapid glacial melting, volcanoes erupted five to 10 times as often — and the more rapid the warming, the more eruptions increased.

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