Ecuador: Rainforests to be Exploited


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Camp appeal: Photos of gorgeous modern tents for urban adventurers


Grist

A tent. It manifests the spontaneous thought of “let’s get away from it all” even if it’s in your own backyard — or atop the neighbor’s roof.

Tents, and an evolving notion of what it means to “camp out,” have of late spawned a fresh design movement aimed at reconnecting us to the outdoors, even in the din of a city. The designs are often beautiful, otherworldly, and thoughtful: Pup tents are giving way to space pods and lunar landers suspended from the trees. Once a canvas tent, tents become a canvas.

And lest you think that this is all frivolity and giant sperms, a tent is often all a person has, the simple walls between their life and elements. Some of these artists and designers are creating spaces and places for the homeless and communities harboring those without homes, empowering tent villages and camp communities.

In truth, all should have a home on Earth. If your…

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Cute, weird, nearly defenseless pangolins are in danger because people won’t stop eating them


Grist

Here are some things to know about the pangolin, according to National Geographic. “The pangolin is not very ferocious. It doesn’t even have teeth. And it’s not very fast.” Its only defense is curling into a tight ball. And as it turns out, that’s not good enough to protect you from a human with a fork.

There are eight species of pangolin, and all eight are in decline. A couple are well on their way to extinction.

Why? Because people are eating them.

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Giant Galapagos tortoises, once extinct in the wild, retake island from invasive rats


Grist

For more than a century, ever since humans introduced them to the Galapagos, rats have ruled Pinzón Island. Just one year ago, 180 million rats lived on this island, hardly seven square miles of land. And because the rats were so hungry for turtle eggs and turtle hatchlings, for years the native giant tortoises — a subspecies called Chelonoidis nigra duncanensis — had to breed in captivity and were considered extinct in the wild.

But now, John R. Platt reports at Scientific American, 118 juvenile tortoises have been let free on the island. And they may just survive — because the rats are gone.

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