Australia: New South Wales – Budderoo NP


The link below is to a media release concerning camping at Carrington Falls in Budderoo National Park, New South Wales, Australia.

For more visit:
http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/media/OEHMedia14021301.htm

Older trees best at fighting climate change


Grist

As humans age, we tend to pass more gas. As trees age, they tend to suck more of it up.

A new paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature has blown away old misconceptions about the roles that the most mature trees in forests play in combating climate change.

It has long been believed that younger trees are better than their older neighbors at absorbing carbon dioxide. But the new research suggests that the opposite is true. It turns out that big trees just keep on growing, at fast rates, and the growth depends on carbon that the trees draw from the air around them.

“In whatever forest you look at, be it old or new growth, it is the largest trees that are the greater carbon sinks,” William Morris, a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne, told Grist. “Not the smaller, younger trees, as was previously thought.”

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We may have to suck up CO2 to prevent planet from frying, U.N. says


Grist

The climate situation is so dire that we may have to resort to geoengineering to keep the planet livable, according to a leaked draft of a forthcoming report from the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The New York Times reports:

Nations have so dragged their feet in battling climate change that the situation has grown critical and the risk of severe economic disruption is rising, according to a draft United Nations report. Another 15 years of failure to limit carbon emissions could make the problem virtually impossible to solve with current technologies, experts found.

A delay would most likely force future generations to develop the ability to suck greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere and store them underground to preserve the livability of the planet, the report found. But it is not clear whether such technologies will ever exist at the necessary scale, and even if they…

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This boat hull was left rusting in a bay until it turned into a forest


Grist

The SS Ayrfield  was built in 1911. It transported supplies to American troops in World War II, and after that it transported coal for decades, until, in 1972, it was sent to Homebush Bay, in Australia, not far from Sydney.

The bay was a dumping ground, and at this time, a “ship breaking” yard. For years the bay was polluted (although Australia cleaned it up around the time of the Sydney Olympics). The hull of the SS Ayrfield, along with a few other ships, was left there to rust. And over the years, the Ayrfield grew into a forested island:

boat1Jason Baker

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