Queensland: North Stradbroke Island – Sand Mining Extension


The link below is to an article that reports on protests against further sand mining on Queensland’s North Stradbroke Island.

For more visit:
http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/stradbroke-groups-protest-mining-operation.htm

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Australia: Queensland – Land Clearing


The link below is to an article that reports on land clearing activities in Queensland and offers you a way to participate in protests against it.

For more visit:
http://support.wwf.org.au/landclearing.html

Article: War on Rats – Lord Howe Island


The link below is to an article reporting on the battle against rats on Lord Howe Island, to the east of the Australian mainland. 

For more visit:
http://www.news.com.au/news/bombs-to-fight-the-killer-rats/story-fnejlrpu-1226426452786

Australia: Cane Toad to Poison Itself


The link below is to an article reporting on a possible breakthrough in the battle against Cane Toads in Australia.

http://www.news.com.au/technology/toad-vs-toad-scientists-discover-way-to-use-cane-toad-poison-against-itself/story-e6frfrnr-1226394501711.

Send a Message to Brazil


Sign the Online Petition Against Deforestation and Illegal Logging

The link below is to an article reporting on the threat of deforestation and illegal logging to the Amazon in Brazil. There is also a link to an online petition urging the Brazilian president to take action. I’ve signed it – will you?

For more visit:
http://www.wwf.org.uk/news_feed.cfm?uNewsID=5952

Good News for Visitors to Uluru


303 There are always pros and cons when it comes to such issues as to whether or not people should be allowed to climb Uluru in the Northern Territory, Australia. To continue to allow visitors to climb the monolith is to go against the wishes of the traditional owners of the site (local aborigines), as well as to continue to impact on the local environs of the Uluru area.

Having said that however, the Uluru site is a site of major significance in Australia and to visitors the world over. If the site is looked after responsibly visitors should be able to climb the rock for many years to come with limited impact to the site.

Currently some 100 000 people climb the rock each year, though a number get no further than ‘chicken rock.’

Visitors will be able to continue to climb Uluru until such time as numbers dwindle significantly (to fewer than 20% of visitors climbing the rock), until such time as the climb is no longer the main reason for a visit to the rock or until a number of new visitor experiences (yet to be developed/thought out) are in place.