Labor pledges $14m funding boost to Environmental Defenders Offices – what do these services do?


Amelia Thorpe, UNSW

The federal Labor Party announced this week that, if elected, it will restore funding to Environmental Defenders Offices (EDOs) across Australia, in a package worth $14 million over four years.

Deputy Opposition Leader Tanya Plibersek explained:

These organisations ensure that ordinary Australians have proper access to the law. We know that big corporations have deep pockets and they’re able to employ expensive legal teams but ordinary Australians – farmers, indigenous communities, ordinary citizens – should have just the same access to the law as anybody with the most expensive lawyers in the country.

What are EDOs?

The first EDO was established in New South Wales in 1985, following the passage of a suite of environmental laws in the late 1970s covering heritage protection, environmental planning approvals, and establishing the Land and Environment Court.

With growing public interest in planning and development, including the celebrated Green Bans movement, those laws introduced new requirements for environmental impact assessment, heritage protection and public participation. They also gave everyone the right to take legal action by bringing environmental matters to court.

Even the best legislation is of little value, however, if people don’t have the means to make use of it. That is where the EDO comes in.

In 1981, shortly after the opening of the new Land and Environment Court, a group of lawyers began working to establish an organisation to empower the community to make use of these new laws to protect the environment. After four years of planning and fundraising, the NSW EDO opened with a staff of one: solicitor Judith Preston.

The idea spread. EDOs were set up in Victoria and Queensland in the early 1990s, and eventually established in all eight states and territories, with an additional office in North Queensland. The various EDOs have always remained separate, each managed by an independent board, although since 1996 they have shared advice and support through a national network.

Punching above their weight

Despite their shoestring budgets, EDO lawyers have proved effective, developing impressive programs of litigation and legal education. With grants from groups such as the Myer Foundation and, later, recurrent funding from state and federal governments, EDOs were a well established part of the Australian legal landscape by the early 2000s.

NSW, Queensland and Victoria were particularly effective in securing funding, each boasting dozens of staff at their peak in the mid-2000s. Thanks to large grants from the NSW Public Purpose Fund and the MacArthur Foundation, the NSW EDO’s staff included not just lawyers but also environmental scientists, an Indigenous solicitor working specifically on Indigenous matters, and a team working from a new regional office in Lismore.

Despite salaries well below market rates, EDO lawyers have consistently punched above their weight. Landmark wins have included defending the WA tourist town of Margaret River against coal mining, and helping the Goolarabooloo community challenge approvals for a liquefied natural gas hub at James Price Point, north of Broome. In 2015 the NSW EDO successfully overturned the approval of Adani’s Carmichael coal mine in central Queensland, although the federal government later reapproved it.




Read more:
Carmichael mine jumps another legal hurdle, but litigants are making headway


With success, particularly against Adani, came criticism. After almost 20 years of bipartisan support, the Abbott government abruptly cut funding to EDOs in 2013 amid allegations of activist “lawfare”. Coalition governments in several states followed suit, prompting staff cuts, restructures, and an increase in fundraising efforts among the EDO network. EDO Victoria became Environmental Justice Australia, the Lismore office closed, and EDOs generally reduced the scale and scope of their work.

While EDOs are best known for their litigation – running high-profile cases on issues such as climate change, conservation and alleged water theft in the Murray-Darling Basin – their work is much broader than this. All EDOs provide free legal education and advice, both via telephone and through community workshops and seminars, many in rural and remote areas. They publish plain-language explanations of a complex range of state and federal environmental laws, a vital resource used by government departments and universities as well as members of the public. EDOs also undertake law reform work, making submissions to parliamentary inquiries and giving expert evidence.




Read more:
Around the world, environmental laws are under attack in all sorts of ways


This work remains vital. As in the 1980s, laws are only as effective as the people who enforce them. As the Productivity Commission explained in its inquiry into access to justice (see page 711 here), “The rationales for government support for environmental matters are well recognised.”

Legal education, outreach, advice and, occasionally, public interest litigation, are essential for environmental justice and should be funded accordingly.The Conversation

Amelia Thorpe, Associate Professor, UNSW

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

How hydrogen power can help us cut emissions, boost exports, and even drive further between refills



File 20180823 149484 hfrzfk.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1
Could this be the way to fill up in future?
CSIRO, Author provided

Sam Bruce, CSIRO

Hydrogen could become a significant part of Australia’s energy landscape within the coming decade, competing with both natural gas and batteries, according to a new CSIRO roadmap for the industry.

Hydrogen gas is a versatile energy carrier with a wide range of potential uses. However, hydrogen is not freely available in the atmosphere as a gas. It therefore requires an energy input and a series of technologies to produce, store and then use it.

Why would we bother? Because hydrogen has several advantages over other energy carriers, such as batteries. It is a single product that can service multiple markets and, if produced using low- or zero-emissions energy sources, it can help us significantly cut greenhouse emissions.

Potential uses for hydrogen.
CSIRO, Author provided

Compared with batteries, hydrogen can release more energy per unit of mass. This means that in contrast to electric battery-powered cars, it can allow passenger vehicles to cover longer distances without refuelling. Refuelling is quicker too, and is likely to stay that way.

The benefits are potentially even greater for heavy vehicles such as buses and trucks which already carry heavy payloads, and where lengthy battery recharge times can affect business models.




Read more:
Could hydrogen fuel cell trucks drive our sustainable transport future?


Hydrogen can also play an important role in energy storage, which will be increasingly necessary both in remote operations such as mine sites, and as part of the electricity grid to help smooth out the contribution of renewables such as wind and solar. This could work by using the excess renewable energy (when generation is high and/or demand is low) to drive hydrogen production via electrolysis of water. The hydrogen can then be stored as compressed gas and put into a fuel cell to generate electricity when needed.

Australia is heavily reliant on imported liquid fuels and does not currently have enough liquid fuel held in reserve. Moving towards hydrogen fuel could potentially alleviate this problem. Hydrogen can also be used to produce industrial chemicals such as ammonia and methanol, and is an important ingredient in petroleum refining.

Further, as hydrogen burns without greenhouse emissions, it is one of the few viable green alternatives to natural gas for generating heat.

Our roadmap predicts that the global market for hydrogen will grow in the coming decades. Among the prospective buyers of Australian hydrogen would be Japan, which is comparatively constrained in its ability to generate energy locally. Australia’s extensive natural resources, namely solar, wind, fossil fuels and available land lend favourably to the establishment of hydrogen export supply chains.

Why embrace hydrogen now?

Given its widespread use and benefit, interest in the “hydrogen economy” has peaked and troughed for the past few decades. Why might it be different this time around? While the main motivation is hydrogen’s ability to deliver low-carbon energy, there are a couple of other factors that distinguish today’s situation from previous years.

Our analysis shows that the hydrogen value chain is now underpinned by a series of mature technologies that are technically ready but not yet commercially viable. This means that the narrative around hydrogen has now shifted from one of technology development to “market activation”.

The solar panel industry provides a recent precedent for this kind of burgeoning energy industry. Large-scale solar farms are now generating attractive returns on investment, without any assistance from government. One of the main factors that enabled solar power to reach this tipping point was the increase in production economies of scale, particularly in China. Notably, China has recently emerged as a proponent for hydrogen, earmarking its use in both transport and distributed electricity generation.

But whereas solar power could feed into a market with ready-made infrastructure (the electricity grid), the case is less straightforward for hydrogen. The technologies to help produce and distribute hydrogen will need to develop in concert with the applications themselves.

A roadmap for hydrogen

In light of this, the primary objective of CSIRO’s National Hydrogen Roadmap is to provide a blueprint for the development of a hydrogen industry in Australia. With several activities already underway, it is designed to help industry, government and researchers decide where exactly to focus their attention and investment.

Our first step was to calculate the price points at which hydrogen can compete commercially with other technologies. We then worked backwards along the value chain to understand the key areas of investment needed for hydrogen to achieve competitiveness in each of the identified potential markets. Following this, we modelled the cumulative impact of the investment priorities that would be feasible in or around 2025.


CSIRO, Author provided

What became evident from the report was that the opportunity for clean hydrogen to compete favourably on a cost basis with existing industrial feedstocks and energy carriers in local applications such as transport and remote area power systems is within reach. On the upstream side, some of the most material drivers of reductions in cost include the availability of cheap low emissions electricity, utilisation and size of the asset.




Read more:
Why is hydrogen fuel making a comeback?


The development of an export industry, meanwhile, is a potential game-changer for hydrogen and the broader energy sector. While this industry is not expected to scale up until closer to 2030, this will enable the localisation of supply chains, industrialisation and even automation of technology manufacture that will contribute to significant reductions in asset capital costs. It will also enable the development of fossil-fuel-derived hydrogen with carbon capture and storage, and place downward pressure on renewable energy costs dedicated to large scale hydrogen production via electrolysis.

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The Conversation

In light of global trends in industry, energy and transport, development of a hydrogen industry in Australia represents a real opportunity to create new growth areas in our economy. Blessed with unparalleled resources, a skilled workforce and established manufacturing base, Australia is extremely well placed to capitalise on this opportunity. But it won’t eventuate on its own.

Sam Bruce, Manager, CSIRO Futures, CSIRO

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Storage can replace gas in our electricity networks and boost renewables


Dylan McConnell, University of Melbourne

Energy storage could replace peak gas in our electricity network. That’s the finding of a study that my colleagues and I recently published in the Journal of Applied Energy.

Energy storage is often considered the holy grail of the electricity sector. Tesla’s Powerwall home battery system, for instance, allows households to store energy from solar panels, to be used when the sun isn’t shining. It is seen as a vital piece of the puzzle in a future with more renewable energy.

Storage is great for households, but could also be as important in the wider electricity network. Here’s how it could work.

Volatile prices

Generators or power stations sell their electricity on a wholesale market (in eastern Australia this is the National Electricity Market or NEM). From there it is passed onto households and businesses by retailers at retail prices. The wholesale price is a significant factor in the cost of electricity (other factors include poles and wires).

The wholesale price varies throughout the day – sometimes quite considerably, as you can see in the chart below from Queensland. In times of peak demand, prices can skyrocket to 300-400 times the average price.

Half-hourly wholesale electricity prices in Queensland, at the beginning of this year. The average price for the full 2014-2015 financial year was about $50/MWh.
(Author provided, data from AEMO)

This volatility is largely a result of physics: generators have to match demand instantaneously, because electrical energy can’t directly be stored.

People don’t use electricity equally throughout the day. Usually electricity use is concentrated at the end of the day, or on the very hottest day of summer when people fire up their air conditioners.

Electricity networks are typically set up to meet the maximum possible peak demand. They meet this demand with flexible generators such as open cycle gas turbines (which are quick to fire up and shut down, unlike generators such as coal-fired power stations). Such “peak” gas generators are typically used less than 5% of the time.

Load duration curve for the National Electricity Market in the 2008-09 financial year. Curve illustrates the percentage of time that the system is at or above a particular demand level. A large amount of capacity is required for small time periods throughout the year.
Author provided, data from AEMO

These rapid variations in energy demand, along with outages of generators or transmission lines and generator bidding behaviour on the market, can result in highly volatile prices. This is where storage can play a role.

Energy can be stored as chemical energy (in the case of batteries), or in other ways such as gravitational potential energy (in the case of pumped hydro), to be used later to generate electricity when convenient.

These electricity storage technologies can also provide peak capacity. In our paper, we found that this was the main value of energy storage. In fact, peak capacity potential may turn out to offer greater value than other options for meeting peak demand.

Surprisingly, we found this value wasn’t affected by energy losses involved in storage (not all energy is recovered when released from storage).

Powering up with storage and renewables

Due to its high flexibility, gas is often considered to be an ideal partner for renewable energy, because it can pick up the slack when the sun isn’t shining or the wind isn’t blowing.

But as the share of renewable energy continues to expand, large-scale electricity storage offers a promising alternative to gas.

In fact, a study by the Australian Energy Market Operator suggested that significant energy storage was crucial to a 100% renewable energy system, in order to minimise costs while maintaining reliability and security standards.

Our research found that storage actually has a competitive advantage over gas when it comes to meeting peak demand. While both can provide peak capacity, storage can also gain extra revenue by taking advantage of smaller price differences that occur on a more frequent (such as daily) basis. When taking this into account, storage may already be cheaper than gas in meeting peak demand. New reports from the US estimate batteries could replace gas in 3-5 years.

Relative costs of providing capacity from an open cycle gas turbine (OCGT) and pumped hydro electric storage (PHES). The right most bar shows the cost of capacity when the revenue from daily arbitrage is taken into account.
(Author provided)

Australia’s electricity system is currently oversupplied with capacity to generate electricity – by around 37%. As such, there appears to be no need for new capacity for the foreseeable future.

However, there may be demand for new storage capacity if older generators are withdrawn from the electricity network. Alternatively, the outlook for storage may improve as renewable energy generation is increased to meet mandated targets.

Increasing penetration of variable renewable energy will increase revenues for storage. In times of high generation output there will be more opportunities for storage owners to shop around for lower prices. This fluctuation between prices is already happening in South Australia.

In this way, storage and renewables may prove mutually beneficial.

The Conversation

Dylan McConnell, Research Fellow, Melbourne Energy Institute, University of Melbourne

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Regent Honeyeater: Captive-bred birds to be Released into Wild


The link below is to an article that reports on the planned release of captive-bred Regent Honeyeaters to boost wild population.

For more visit:
http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/regent-honeyeater-population-gets-a-boost.htm