Article: Wildlife – The Three-Toed Pygmy Sloth


Less Than 100 Animals Remain

The following link is to an article reporting on the endangered Three-Toed Pygmy Sloth. Less than 100 of these animals now remain in the wild on the uninhabited Escudo Island off Panama.

For more visit:
http://news.mongabay.com/2012/0523-hance-pygmy-sloths.html

AUSTRALIA: ENVIRONMENTAL DISASTER UNFOLDING ON QUEENSLAND COAST


An environmental disaster is unfolding on the Queensland coast, with the oil spill from the Hong Kong-flagged ship Pacific Adventurer. The Pacific Adventurer was badly damaged during the Cyclone Hamish weather event last week.

The Pacific Adventurer somehow managed to get caught up in the cyclone despite very early warnings concerning the cyclone. Some 31 containers containing ammonium nitrate were washed into the sea during the cyclone and as this occurred the ship itself was badly damaged, leaking some 230 tonnes of oil into the ocean. The initial report from the ship was that some 30 tonnes of oil had been lost.

The environmental disaster is huge, with the oil now affecting over 60km of coastline, including the eastern coast of Moreton Island. Sea life is being severely impacted by the disaster.

The cleanup is being done at a rate of about 1 to 2 km a day, which means it will take quite some time to complete.

Also of concern are the 31 containers of ammonium nitrate that are still missing and which could further contaminate the region. Navy mine hunters are being called in to search for the containers which remain a shipping hazard.

RARE BONGO BREEDING PROGRAM GOING WELL


A breeding program for the rare Lowland or Western Bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus eurycerus) is going well at Australia’s Western Plains Zoo. One month ago a calf (called Djembe, which means drum) was born at the zoo and is doing well. Djembe is the fourth calf born at the zoo.

The calf was born using caesarean section because of difficulties with the birth. Despite fears of the mother rejecting Djembe, which sometimes happens with caesarean births, young Djembe is going well and being cared for by her mother.

The Lowland Bongo is one of the largest African forest antelopes and is in serious decline. It is thought that about 25 000 animals remain in their natural central African habitat.

BELOW: Footage of a Bongo in Captivity