As Arctic ship traffic increases, narwhals and other unique animals are at risk


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A pod of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in central Baffin Bay. Narwhals are the most vulnerable animals to increased ship traffic in the Arctic Ocean.
Kristin Laidre/University of Washington, CC BY-ND

Donna Hauser, University of Alaska Fairbanks; Harry Stern, University of Washington, and Kristin Laidre, University of Washington

Most Americans associate fall with football and raking leaves, but in the Arctic this season is about ice. Every year, floating sea ice in the Arctic thins and melts in spring and summer, then thickens and expands in fall and winter.

As climate change warms the Arctic, its sea ice cover is declining. This year scientists estimate that the Arctic sea ice minimum in late September covered 1.77 million square miles (4.59 million square kilometers), tying the sixth lowest summertime minimum on record.

With less sea ice, there is burgeoning interest in shipping and other commercial activity throughout the Northwest Passage – the fabled route that links the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, via Canada’s convoluted Arctic archipelago – as well as the Northern Sea Route, which cuts across Russia’s northern seas. This trend has serious potential impacts for Arctic sea life.

In a recent study, we assessed the vulnerability of 80 populations of Arctic marine mammals during the “open-water” period of September, when sea ice is at its minimum extent. We wanted to understand the relative risks of vessel traffic across Arctic marine mammal species, populations and regions. We found that more than half (53 percent) of these populations – including walruses and several types of whales – would be exposed to vessels in Arctic sea routes. This could lead to collisions, noise disturbance or changes in the animals’ behavior.

Map of the Arctic region showing the the Northern Sea Route and Northwest Passage.
Arctic Council/Susie Harder

Less ice, more ships

More than a century ago, Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen became the first European to navigate the entire Northwest Passage. Due to the short Arctic summer, it took Amundsen’s 70-foot wooden sailing ship three years to make the journey, wintering in protected harbors.

Fast-forward to summer 2016, when a cruise ship carrying more than 1,000 passengers negotiated the Northwest Passage in 32 days. The summer “open-water” period in the Arctic has now increased by more than two months in some regions. Summer sea ice cover has shrunk by over 30 percent since satellites started regular monitoring in 1979.

Bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) in Disko Bay, West Greenland.
Kristin Laidre, CC BY

Arctic seas are home to a specialized group of marine mammals found nowhere else on Earth, including beluga and bowhead whales, narwhals, walruses, ringed and bearded seals and polar bears. These species are critical members of Arctic marine ecosystems, and provide traditional resources to Indigenous communities across the Arctic.

According to ecologists, all of these animals are susceptible to sea ice loss. Research at lower latitudes has also shown that marine mammals can be affected by noise from vessels because of their reliance on sound, as well as by ship strikes. These findings raise concerns about increasing vessel traffic in the Arctic.

Ringed seal (Pusa hispida) pup in Alaska.
NOAA

Sensitivity times exposure equals vulnerability

To determine which species could be at risk, we estimated two key factors: Exposure – how much a population’s distribution overlaps with the Northwest Passage or Northern Sea Route during September – and sensitivity, a combination of biological, ecological and vessel factors that may put a population at a higher risk.

As an illustration, imagine calculating vulnerability to air pollution. People generally are more exposed to air pollution in cities than in rural areas. Some groups, such as children and the elderly, are also more sensitive because their lungs are not as strong as those of average adults.

We found that many whale and walrus populations were both highly exposed and sensitive to vessels during the open-water period. Narwhals – medium-sized toothed whales with a large spiral tusk – scored as most vulnerable overall. These animals are endemic to the Arctic, and spend much of their time in winter and spring in areas with heavy concentrations of sea ice. In our study, they ranked as both highly exposed and highly sensitive to vessel effects in September.

Narwhals have a relatively restricted range. Each summer they migrate to the same areas in the Canadian high Arctic and around Greenland. In fall they migrate south in pods to offshore areas in Baffin Bay and Davis Strait, where they spend the winter making deep dives under the dense ice to feed on Greenland halibut. Many narwhal populations’ core summer and fall habitat is right in the middle of the Northwest Passage.

A pod of narwhals (Monodon monoceros) in central Baffin Bay. Narwhals are the most vulnerable animals to increased ship traffic in the Arctic during September.
NOAA/OAR/OER/Kristin Laidre

Vulnerable Arctic regions, species and key uncertainties

The western end of the Northwest Passage and the eastern end of the Northern Sea Route converge at the Bering Strait, a 50-mile-wide waterway separating Russia and Alaska. This area is also a key migratory corridor for thousands of beluga and bowhead whales, Pacific walruses and ringed and bearded seals. In this geographic bottleneck and other narrow channels, marine mammals are particularly vulnerable to vessel traffic.

Among the species we assessed, polar bears were least vulnerable to September vessel traffic because they generally spend the ice-free season on land. Of course, longer ice-free seasons are also bad for polar bears, which need sea ice as a platform for hunting seals. They may also be vulnerable to oil spills year-round.

Research in the harsh and remote Arctic seas is notoriously difficult, and there are many gaps in our knowledge. Certain areas, such as the Russian Arctic, are less studied. Data are sparse on many marine mammals, especially ringed and bearded seals. These factors increased the uncertainty in our vessel vulnerability scores.

We concentrated on late summer, when vessel traffic is expected to be greatest due to reduced ice cover. However, ice-strengthened vessels can also operate during spring, with potential impacts on seals and polar bears that are less vulnerable in September. The window of opportunity for navigation is growing as sea ice break-up happens earlier in the year and freeze-up occurs later. These changes also shift the times and places where marine mammals could be exposed to vessels.

The Arctic Ocean is covered with floating sea ice in winter, but the area of sea ice in late summer has decreased more than 30 percent since 1979. The Arctic Ocean is projected to be ice-free in summer within decades.

Planning for a navigable Arctic

Recent initiatives in the lower 48 states offer some models for anticipating and managing vessel-marine mammal interactions. One recent study showed that modeling could be used to predict blue whale locations off the California coast to help ships avoid key habitats. And since 2008, federal regulations have imposed seasonal and speed restrictions on ships in the North Atlantic to minimize threats to critically endangered right whales. These practical examples, along with our vulnerability ranking, could provide a foundation for similar steps to protect marine mammals in the Arctic.

The International Maritime Organization has already adopted a Polar Code, which was developed to promote safe ship travel in polar waters. It recommends identifying areas of ecological importance, but does not currently include direct strategies to designate important habitats or reduce vessel effects on marine mammals, although the organization has taken steps to protect marine habitat in the Bering Sea.

Even if nations take rigorous action to mitigate climate change, models predict that September Arctic sea ice will continue to decrease over the next 30 years. There is an opportunity now to plan for an increasingly accessible and rapidly changing Arctic, and to minimize risks to creatures that are found nowhere else on Earth.The Conversation

Donna Hauser, Research Assistant Professor, International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks; Harry Stern, Principal Mathematician, Polar Science Center, University of Washington, and Kristin Laidre, Associate Professor of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences, University of Washington

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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Nature’s traffic engineers have come up with many simple but effective solutions



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Ant colonies direct traffic flows of millions of individuals along the best routes – army ants even manage inbound and outbound lanes – but how?
Geoff Gallice/Wikimedia, CC BY

Tanya Latty, University of Sydney

This is the third article in our series, Moving the Masses, about managing the flow of crowds of individuals, be they drivers or pedestrians, shoppers or commuters, birds or ants.


As more and more people move to cities, the experience of being stuck in impenetrable gridlock becomes an increasingly common part of the human experience. But managing traffic isn’t just a human problem. From the tunnels built by termites to the enormous underground networks built by fungi, life forms have evolved incredible ways of solving the challenge of moving large numbers of individuals and resources from one place to another.

But how do natural systems – which lack engineers or in some cases even brains – build and manage their transportation networks?

Building a transport network

Perhaps the most familiar animal transport systems are the trail networks of ants. As ants walk through their environment they leave behind tiny droplets of an attractive chemical called a pheromone. Other ants are attracted to the chemical bouquet and as they follow it they add to the trail by leaving their own droplets of pheromone. Like Hansel and Gretel leaving a trail of breadcrumbs, ants use their trails to find their way back home.

The Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) builds chemical trail networks that connect their nests using the shortest possible path. Connecting points via the shortest path saves on construction costs by using less material and requiring less effort.

Argentine ant trails connect nests using an approximation of the shortest path. The grey lines are ant trails visualised by overlaying several photos of the trail system. The inset shows the actual shortest path solution.
Tanya Latty- supplied

Yet calculating the shortest path between a set of points is a very difficult task. So how do ants, which have brains smaller than a pinhead, figure out the solution?

The answer is elegant in its simplicity. Short, direct paths are faster to traverse, and so more pheromone gets deposited by the higher density of ants. As ants are more likely to follow stronger pheromone trails, shorter, more direct trails attract more ants than do long meandering trails.

Meanwhile, fewer and fewer ants travel along the long paths, as they are attracted away by the stronger, shorter path. Eventually the longer paths disappear altogether due to evaporation, leaving only the direct routes. This simple mechanism allows small-brained Argentine ants to solve a difficult problem.

Australian meat ants (Iridomyrmex purpureus) take trail-building to the next level. Meat ants diligently cut away all vegetation from their trails, creating a smooth path. Unlike Argentine ants, meat ants do not connect their nests using the shortest possible route. Instead they build a network that includes extra “redundant” links.

Meat ants clear the grass from their trails and nest.
Nathan Brown, Author provided

Connecting points with the shortest path takes less time and uses less energy, but it would also result in a fragile network; any damage to any trail would isolate one of the nests.

This is less of an issue for Argentine ants, which can rapidly repair any damage to their trail system by depositing more pheromone droplets. For meat ants, however, damage to the system takes more time to fix. So rather than building a cheap but fragile network, meat ants build networks whose structure neatly balances the competing demands of cost and robustness.

Walking in lanes

In most human road networks, traffic flows are organised by dividing traffic into lanes where all the cars travel in the same direction. The army ant (Eciton burchellii) also uses lanes – two outer ones for outbound traffic, and one inner lane for nest-bound traffic.

But how do the army ants organise this? Lanes form because ants heading to the nest often carry heavy loads and so tend not to turn away during head-on collisions. Ants leaving the nest tend to veer away from their heavily laden sisters and so end up in the outer lanes.

Again, a simple set of behavioural rules allows ants to ensure they have a fast, efficient transport system.

Pothole pluggers

Potholes are an annoying and jarring part of driving that can slow traffic to a crawl. So when workers of the army ant (Eciton burchellii) encounter uneven surfaces, they take one for the team and plug it with their living bodies. Workers even match their size to the hole that needs filling.

Teams of ants cooperate to fill larger holes. Ants will even form bridges to span larger gaps. They adjust the width, length and position of the bridge to accommodate changes in traffic.

The result of these hardworking ants is a smooth, fast-flowing transport system that works even over the bumpiest terrain.

Humongous fungus

It’s not just insects that build transport networks. Brainless organisms such as fungi and slime moulds are also master transportation designers.

Fungi build some of the biggest biological transportation systems on Earth. One giant network of honey fungus (Armillaria solidipes) spanned 9.6km. The network is made up of tiny tubules called mycelia, which distribute nutrients around the fungi’s body.

The honey fungus is connected by vast underground transportation networks, spanning many kilometres.
Armand Robichaud/Flickr, CC BY-NC

Slime moulds – which are not fungi but giant single-celled amoebas – use a network of veins to connect food sources to one another.

In a highly creative experiment, researchers used tiny bits of food to make a map of the Tokyo metro system, with the food representing stations. Amazingly, the slime mould quickly connected all the points in a pattern that closely matched the actual Tokyo metro system. It seems slime moulds and engineers use the same rules when constructing transport networks – yet the slime mould does it without the aid of computers, maps or even a brain!

Slime mould form a map of the Tokyo railway system.

Nature has found many different solutions to the universal problem of building and managing a transport system. By studying biological systems, perhaps we can pick up a few tips for improving our own systems.


The ConversationYou can find other articles in the series here.

Tanya Latty, Senior lecturer, University of Sydney

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Media Release: Myall Lakes National Park


The link below is to a media release concerning the Myall Lakes National Park. Both Mungo and Bennett’s Beaches have been reopened to 4WD traffic.

For more visit:
http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/media/17071304.htm

Sea Shepherd: Founder Arrested


The link below is to an article reporting on the arrest of Paul Watson, founder of Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, for ‘violation of ships traffic’ some ten years ago.

For more visit:
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/antiwhaling-activist-arrested-for-ramming-boat-10-years-ago-7746817.html