Grand Canyon Development Plan Sparks Dispute


TIME

As morning light painted the far-reaching buttes of the Grand Canyon gold, Renae Yellowhorse stood at the edge of the canyon’s rim, looked out toward where the rivers met below her, and smiled.

“It is my church, it is where I say my prayers. It is where I give my offerings. It’s where I commune with the holy ones, the gods that walk along the canyon,” said Yellowhorse, a member of the Navajo Nation.

This place, called “the confluence,” is where the Colorado River meets the Little Colorado River on the canyon’s east side. According to the Navajo creation story, the confluence is where their people first emerged.

And now this Navajo-owned land is at the center of an ugly land-use dispute…

Read the rest of the story from our partners at NBC News

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Potoroos settling in at Booderee


Parks Australia

At the end of October last year we transferred 27 long-nosed potoroos to suitable habitat in Booderee National Park after they had been extinct in the area for many years. Since the translocation we’ve been monitoring the population closely, using camera and cage traps to determine their survival.

The potoroos have had us guessing the last couple of weeks. We didn’t see any potoroos for about three weeks, but we did see a red fox.

Small mammals are very vulnerable to predators such as foxes so we run a comprehensive – and very successful –  fox control program using bait. This has reduced foxes to very low numbers, but at this time of year we see a number of young foxes moving into the park. Last week we buried the fox bait at the camera site where the fox was spotted.

That same day we saw a small potoroo at the…

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